Posts Tagged "Mento Jamaican Music"

Must Do: Fi Wi Sinting Festival | Portland Jamaica | Feb 17, 2013

Posted by on Jan 21, 2013 in Blog, Festivals/Events, Jamaican Culture, Maroons, Portland Jamaica | 0 comments

Must Do: Fi Wi Sinting Festival | Portland Jamaica | Feb 17, 2013

Family Fun at Portland's Fi Wi Sinting Festival The 23rd staging of Fi Wi Sinting, a celebration of Jamaica’s African heritage, will be held on Sunday, February 17, 2013, at Somerset Falls, Hope Bay, Portland from 10AM-8PM. Admission J$800 (about US$9.00), Children J$200 (about US $2.50) and Students with ID J$500 (about US$5.50). The phrase "Fi Wi Sinting" means "It is ours" in Jamaican patois, and represents how Jamaicans embrace and celebrate the food, traditions and customs that followed their ancestors from Africa. Take the entire family and enjoy a fun-filled day of mingling with...

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Jolly Boys 1st Time Ever in New York City | February 24th | Hiro Ballroom

Posted by on Feb 23, 2011 in Festivals/Events, Mento Jamaican Music, Port Antonio Jamaica, Portland Jamaica, The Jolly Boys | 0 comments

Yes, Jamaica had music before reggae, and the Jolly Boys will be taking their quirky blend of traditional and modern mento music - the music of Jamaica before ska, rocksteady and reggae - to the Big Apple for the first time ever with a highly anticipated show at the Hiro Ballroom in New York on Thursday, February 24th, 2011! The Jolly Boys, a rough-and-tumble band, have been performing for 60 years and are well-known for having followed around and played for Errol Flynn at his legendary parties in the 1950s. Foundation members include Albert Minott on vocals and guitar; Joseph ‘Powder’...

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Jolly Boys head to Ireland!

Posted by on Aug 25, 2010 in Blog, Festivals/Events, Jamaican Music, Mento Jamaican Music, The Jolly Boys | 0 comments

The Jolly Boys lead Jamaican sounds in Trenchtown Wednesday 25th August 2010 Trenchtown returns to Ireland's Electric Picnic to add a touch of the Caribbean to the festivities. A Jamaican village right in the heart of the festival, Trenchtown offers the sites, sounds, tastes of the island in the Stradbally forest. Curated by Martin Hickey who spends 6 months of the year sourcing the finest that Jamaica has to offer. Jamaica's answer to Cuba's Buena Vista Social Club, The Jolly Boys will be making their first ever visit to Ireland, to make their debut appearance. Joining them in the woods...

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Jolly Boys bring ‘Great Expectation’ | New album from these Mento greats!

Posted by on Jun 27, 2010 in Blog, Festivals/Events, Jamaican Music, Kingston Jamaica, Mento Jamaican Music, The Jolly Boys | 0 comments

Jolly Boys bring ‘Great Expectation’ | New album from these Mento greats!

Jolly Boys bring 'Great Expectation' Published: Sunday | June 27, 2010 Mento band looks to rejoin mainstream, change the image of 'country people music' Mel Cooke, Gleaner Writer Mento, in its original format, is 'country people music', the banjo, maracas and rhumba box needing no electronic amplification to carry home in rural areas of a country where there is still need for a rural electrification programme. Somewhere along the timeline of Jamaica's popular musical development, though, it became relegated to 'tourist music', the floral-shirt-clad figures beaming under straw hats and...

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Portland’s Jolly Boys | Marvelous Mento Music

Posted by on Jun 24, 2010 in Blog, Jamaica Travel, Jamaican Culture, Mento Jamaican Music, Port Antonio Jamaica, Portland Jamaica | 0 comments

Did you ever wonder what came before ska, rocksteady and reggae? Well, if you've not yet had the pleasure, let me introduce you to Port Antonio's wonderful Jolly Boys. The Jolly Boys have been creating and playing their Jamaican mento music for more than 50 years and are still going strong! First, a short mento lesson (partial credit to wikipedia.com): Mento is a style of Jamaican folk music that predates and has greatly influenced ska and reggae music. Mento typically features acoustic instruments, such as acoustic guitar, banjo, hand drums, and the rumba box — a large mbira in the shape of...

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